Monthly Archives: June 2016

How many interior designers does it take to change a lightbulb?

Don’t worry I’m not venturing into the world of stand up comedy. Anyone who has heard me tell a joke knows that would be a mistake. But I would like to update the joke from how many (insert  profession, nationality, gender etc) does it take to change a lightbulb, to how long does it take them. I say this because ‘fess up, how many of you have:

  1. Left a lightbulb unchanged after it has blown for more than a month
  2. Put up a new light and stuck an ugly lightbulb in it just to get it lit then never got round to putting a better one in
  3. Noticed that each lightbulb in your matching pendant or ceiling lights is a different colour or wattage and done nothing about it
  4. All of the above

I’m an interior designer and I would have to tick option 4.

But today I smacked myself round the chops and sorted out all my lightbulb laziness in one fell swoop. I could tell you that I drew up an inventory of lightbulbs needed, did weeks of extensive research, placed multiple orders and spent half a day correcting all my mistakes, but I’d be lying.  Here’s what really happened.

It started with these lovely cage lights.

Lights vintage industrial Edison cage wall sconce lights

Image via Amazon

I wanted two for my utility room which has just had a makeover (more on that soon). I found them on Amazon for £20.99 each with free delivery thanks to my Amazon Prime membership, which BTW paid for itself in no time at all thanks to all the stuff I order online. I liked the size, the price and the fact they are hinged so the cage can point up, down, sideways or at a jaunty angle. I also liked how good they look with a filament lightbulb

Lightess vintage industrial Edison cage wall sconce light

Image via Amazon

What I didn’t realise though was that I would need a lightbulb that would fit through the cage as the neck of the cage is really narrow. So in the interim I stuck some ugly but skinny LED lightbulbs in (see below…) and went on the hunt for pretty ones.

Ugly narrow 60W LED lightbulb

A lot of the filament lightbulbs available have been designed for restaurants and bars, who want moody or romantic lighting not an airport runway so they tend to be 40W max. My utility room is below ground with one tiny window looking onto my garden path so I needed at least 60W if I wanted to stop mixing my darks with whites. After a couple of evenings on the couch I finally found these beauties on Amazon.

KINGSO E27 T10 60W vintage Edison style carbon filamented lightbulb

Image via Amazon

LED? Check. Right size? Check. Bright enough? Check. Pretty? Check. Right price? Hell yes. £10.68 for a pack of 6 with free Amazon Prime delivery which works out at just £1.78 each and 3000 hours of bright and beautiful light per lightbulb. Bingo. They’re from KingSo a US retailer but available on Amazon through Lerpby

KINGSO 6 pack of E27 T10 60W Vintage Edison style carbon filament lightbulbs

Image via Amazon

And this my friends is how my other lightbulb mistakes got fixed. I used two to replace the ugly ones in the utility room. I then had a lightbulb moment (I had to get that in somewhere) and put one in the landing light as the lightbulb blew last month. In my defence when it’s light from 4am to 10.30pm its hard to motivate yourself to rummage in the garage for a replacement, carry a chair upstairs to stand on, fiddle with the awkward screws that hold the very fragile amber glass shade in place and change the lightbulb. Apologies for the naff picture. It’s really hard to photograph a lit lightbulb, especially when there’s a window in the background.

John Lewis amber glass pendant light with filament lightbulb

As an aside filament lightbulbs look lovely in clear glass but they are in their element (no pun intended) in amber glass shades – see.

How a filament lightbulb looks in clear glass versus amber glass

I put the last three in my summer house where I had managed to commit all three sins. A blown lightbulb, an ugly lightbulb, and a mix of different coloured lightbulbs (one cool white and two warm white). Now doesn’t that look better.

Pendant lighting in Nordic style summer house / bar

If this has caused you to look round your home and acknowledge all the broken, ugly and mismatched lightbulbs you own, and you’re considering the filament route Nook London has a great range of shapes and sizes. Most are 40W but you could go for a large globe and lose the shade. Or install a cluster of the same lightbulbs….

Three bulb pendant light with filament lightbulb from Notonthehighstreet

Image via Notonthehighstreet.com

or a cluster of different lightbulb shapes or filament styles.

Cluster of mismatched filament lightbulb from Fritz Fryer

Image via Fritz Fryer

If you can’t find a multi-pendant light you like you can fit multiple pendants or get your electrician to fit them under one ceiling rose. Coloured cable adds a bit of extra impact. Or create a modern chandelier by fitting ceiling hooks and looping the cable through them. If you’re feeling adventurous Nook London have all the accessories you’ll ever need.

Modern chandelier using multiple filament lightbulb and ceiling hooks

Image via Pinterest

Last point before i stop waffling. Don’t think you have to betray your local retailers and shop online to get the best range and prices. Find the lights you like and show them to your local guys, sometimes they can source the same or a similar item for the same price or even less as I found out recently when my local retailer ordered a bathroom light for me for half the price of a major online retailer.

So right go – fix that lightbulb laziness right now.